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Socio- Psychological Novels
Arthur Golden (1956 – ) is the author of the bestselling novel Memoirs of a Geisha (1997). This is a peculiar story from a geisha’s point of view, written after spending a period in China Golden had already expressed his love for Eastern cultures as he graduated at Harvard University in art with a specialization in Japanese art and history and learned Mandarin Chinese. In 2005, Memoirs of a Geisha was made into a feature film and directed by Rob Marshall.

Anne Tyler (1941 – ) spent her childhood in Quaker communities and didn’t attend a school until she was 11. This experience enabled her to look at ‘the normal world with a certain amount of distance and surprise’. She graduated in Russian studies and worked as a librarian and bibliographer before getting married to the Iranian psychiatrist and novelist Taghi Mohammad Modarressi, who died in 1997. She was awarded many prizes for her novels Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant (1982), The Accidental Tourist (1985; made into a 1988 movie directed by Lawrence Kasdan), Breathing Lessons (1988) set in Baltimore, Maryland, where she lives.

Shalom Auslander (1970 – ) author and essayist. grew up in an Orthodox Jewish neighbourhood near New York. His writing style is notable for its Jewish perspective and determinedly negative outlook. Among his works are Lament: A Memoir (2007)and Beware of God: Stories (2005).

Jonathan Safran Foer (1977 – ) is an American Jewish author who graduated from Princeton in 1999 with a degree in Philosophy. In 1995 Safran Foer took an introductory writing course with author Joyce Carol Oates. The writer took interest in his way of writing and supported his idea to travel to Ukraine to expand his thesis and know more about his grandfather’s life, the Holocaust survivor Louis Safran. This experience supplied him the material for his best known novel Everything Is Illuminated (2002) about his journey to Ukraine in search of Augustine, the woman who saved his grandfather’s life during the Nazi period. The following work is Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2005) about a nine-year-old boy, who, after his father’s death, discovers a key in a vase and search all of New York for information about it .

Nafisa Haji was born of an Indian family who moved to The USA in the late 1960s shortly before she was born, as her father could study engineering at Stanford. She spent her life between India and America. Nafisa studied American history at Berkeley, taught elementary school in Los Angeles, and got a doctorate in education from the University of California at Los Angeles. At first she wrote short stories, which then developed into an idea for a novel, The Writing On My Forehead (2009) about the secrets and scandals of an Indian family’s past.

Torey L. Hayden (Victoria Lynn Hayden, 1951- ), is a female child psychologist, special education teacher and university lecturer. She writes books about her real-life experiences with teaching and counselling children with special problems such as autism, Tourette syndrome, sexual abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome, and elective mutism (or selective mutism), her specialty.
She has written three books of fiction , The Sunflower Forest (1984), The Mechanical Cat (1999) and The Very Worst Thing (2003), in addition to her non-fiction books .

Jon Krakauer (1954 – ), writer and mountaineer and well known for his writing about the outdoors and mountain-climbing, is the author of best-selling non-fiction books. Into the Wild (1996) is about the true story of Christopher McCandless, a young man who, after graduating from college, began a journey in the American West. The novel was adapted into a film by Sean Penn in 2007.Into Thin Air, (1997) describes the experiences and the general state of Everest mountaineering. Under the Banner of Heaven (2003) examines the extremes of religious belief, particularly of Mormonism. Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman (2007) reports the journals and letters of Pat Tillman, professional football player and US Army Ranger who died in Afghanistan becoming a symbol of American sacrifice and heroism.

Jamie Ford (?), great-grandson of mining pioneer Min Chung, emigrant from China to San Francisco where he adopted the Western name Ford. Short-story writer, and alumnus of the Squaw Valley Community of Writers, and of Orson Scott Card’s Literary Boot Camp, has achieved success with Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet (2009), a novel which supplies a glimpse of the damage to the hearts and humanity of individual people caused by war.

Thrillers and detective stories

Mary Higgins Clark (Mary Theresa Eleanor Higgins Clark Conheeney, 1927 – ) began writing at an early age after working as a secretary and copy editor, and as a stewardess for Pan-American Airlines. Among her very popular forty-two suspense novels are Aspire To The Heavens (1968, reissued in 2000 as Mount Vernon Love Story), Where Are The Children? (1975), A Cry in the Night (1982), Silent Night (1995), Where Are You Now? (2008), Dashing Through the Snow (with her daughter Carol Higgins Clark, 2008 ), Just Take My Heart (2009), The Shadow of Your Smile (2010), and I’ll Walk Alone (2011),
The Magical Christmas Horse (2011, illustrated by Wendell Minor), The Lost Years (2012)
Daddy’s Gone A Hunting (2013). Many of her books have been adapted into films for cinema and television: A Stranger is Watching was directed by Sean S. Cunningham; Where are the children by Bruce Malmuth in 1986; We’ll meet again by Michael Storey in 2000 ; Lucky day is a TV film directed by Penelope Buitenhuis in 2002 and in the same years was shot All around the town directed by Poalo Barzman. Her daughter, Carol Higgins Clark, is also a suspense writer.

Mary Jane Clark, is the author of two series of suspense- media thrillers influenced by her father’s career as FBI agent and by three decades of experience in broadcast journalism. Her murder mysteries are investigated and solved by the characters who work at KEY News, the fictional television news world she has created. Her next series is The Wedding Cake Mysteries, their protagonist is an unusual wedding cake designer who gets involved in murder cases which threaten to prevent ceremonies. Her novels include Do You Want to Know a Secret (1998), Do You Promise Not to Tell (1999), Let Me Whisper in Your Ear (2000), It Only Takes a Moment (2008), and Dying for Mercy (2009)
Mary Clark’s former mother-in-law is the well-known American author Mary Higgins Clark.

Susan Elizabeth George (1949-) is an author of mystery novels set in Great Britain.
His best known character is Inspector Lynley also adapted for television by the BBC as The Inspector Lynley Mysteries. Among the titles are A Great Deliverance (1988), Careless in Red (2008) and This Body of Death (2010).

John Micheael Crichton: (1942 –2008), author, producer, director, and screenwriter, best known for his work in the science fiction, medical fiction, thriller genres and for his participation in TV series in movie productions as ER, Jurassic Park, Disclosure.
His novels often explore technology and failures of human interaction with it, especially resulting in catastrophes with biotechnology and reflect his medical training and science background. Among others, he wrote The Andromeda Strain (1969), Congo (1980), Sphere (1987), Jurassic Park (1990), Rising Sun (1992), Disclosure (1994), The Lost World (1995), Airframe (1996), Timeline (1999), Prey (2002), State of Fear (2004), Next (2008, the final book published before his death), Pirate Latitudes (2009, posthumous). Most of his books have been adapted for the cinema.

Donna Leon (1942 – ) is the author of a series of crime novels set in Venice. The protagonist is the Commissario Guido Brunetti. The writer has worked as a lecturer in English Literature in Italy and has lived in Venice for over twenty-five years. Now she has concentrated on writing and other cultural activities in the field of music, especially Baroque music. The first title of the series is
Death at La Fenice (1992), the latest About Face (2009) and A Question of Belief (2010).

James B. Patterson (1947- ) is largely known for his series about American psychologist Alex Cross. Patterson also wrote the Michael Bennett, Women’s Murder Club, Maximum Ride, Daniel X, and Witch & Wizard series, as well as many stand-alone thrillers, non-fiction and romance novels.
Among the titles of the Alex Cross series are the first, Along Came a Spider (1993, made into a film by Lee Tamahori in 2001), I, Alex Cross (2009), Cross Fire ( 2010), Crossover (2011)

Joe Richard Harold Lansdale (1951 – ), a martial-arts expert. whose production ranger from novels to shory stories, comics and graphic novels, touching numerous genres like Western, horror, science fiction, mystery, and suspense. He has also written for comics as well as Batman: The Animated Series.
His way of writing is ironic and the situations he describes are mostly strange or absurd situations and extremely dark matters,. Among the titles are Mucho Mojo (1994), Rumble Tumble (1998) Devil Red (2011). Other famous cicles are Drive-in and the Ned the Seal trilogy.

Glenn Cooper (1953 – ) graduated both in Medicine and in Archaeology. He worked as a physicist specialized in infective illnesses and as archaeologist particularly in England. Then he started writing screenplays and, after a quite unsuccessful period, he began with a few pages of a new script called Library of the Dead ( USA: Secret of Seventh Son) which turned into a highly successful novel (2009)
In 2010 Book of Souls was released ,as a sequel of The Library of the Dead and with the same protagonist, Will Piper . Other future projects are the novels The Tenth Chamber (2011) and
Near death.

Patricia Cornwell (Patricia Carroll Daniels, 1956) is a crime writer widely known for her popular series of novels about the cases of a woman medical examiner, Dr. Kay Scarpetta. Among the titles of this series are Postmortem (1990), Predator (2005), Book of the Dead (2007), The Scarpetta Factor (2009), Port Mortuary (2010). Another series are Andy Brazil – Judy Hammer and At Risk – Win Garano.

Dan Brown (1964 -) is an author of thriller with the recurring themes of cryptography, keys, symbols, codes, and conspiracy theories: The protagonist is Robert Langdon, professor and amateur detective. His best selling book was The Da Vinci Code, but he had already written and Angels & Demons, both of them adapted into films by Ron Howard. Other titles are Digital Fortress, Deception Point (2000), The Lost Symbol (2008)

Barry Eisler (1964 – ), a Judo Black Belt, graduated from Cornell Law School in 1989, and joined the CIA, where he worked till 1992. Afterwards he was technology lawyer and startup executive in Silicon Valley and Japan. He started writing full time in 2002 when his successful novel Rain Fall appeared. It was the first of the thriller series about the anti-hero John Rain, a half-Japanese, half-American soldier turned into freelance assassin. A second series feature the black soldier Ben Treven. Among other famous titles are Requiem For an Assassin (2008), Fault Line (2009) and Inside Out (2010).

Matthew Pearl (?) novelist and educator, attended Harvard College and Yale Law School and has taught writing and literature at Emerson College and Harvard University. His novels include The Dante Club (2003), about a gropu of poets translating Dante amidst a series of murders in the American Civil War; The Poe Shadow (2006), the story of one young lawyer’s quest to solve the mystery of Edgar Allan Poe’s death in 1849 and The Last Dickens (2009), about the disappearance of C. Dickens’s unfinished novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood .

Katherine Howe (?)graduated at the Kinkaid School and Columbia University and began writing fiction while working on her doctoral dissertation in American and New England Studies
Her novel The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane takes place in Massachusetts, and is set in 1991 with flash backs to the Salem witch trials in 1692.

Fantasy
James Rollins and James Clemens are two of the pen names of American veterinarian Jim Czajkowski (1961 -), author of fantasy and adventure-thrillers. His hobbies as amateur spelunker and certified scuba diver supplied him with material for his novels which are are often set in underground or underwater sites.his literary source is the Doc Savage series
Amonh his fantasy novels are Wit’ch Fire, Wit’ch Storm, Wit’ch War, Wit’ch Gate, Wit’ch Star, Shadowfall (2005), and Hinterland (2006) .
In 2007, he wrote the novelization of the script for the movie Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

Stephenie Meyer ( Stephanie Morgan 1973 – ), is known for her vampire romance series Twilight about an unusually good vampire, Edward Cullen, his love romance with Bella, a common human being and their fight against the evil forces. Meyer is also the author of the adult science-fiction novel The Host.

Anne Rice (Howard Allen O’Brien; 1941 -) is an author of gothic, erotic, and religious-themed books from New Orleans, Louisiana. Her Vampire Chronicles series started with Interview with the Vampire ( 1973, 1994’s movie directed by Neil Jordan ) and now includes over a dozen novels, like 1985’s The Vampire Lestat and 1988’s The Queen of the Damned. Rice has written three novels in the Lives of the Mayfair Witches sequence. Along with several non-series works, the author wrote three novels under the pseudonym A. N. Roquelaure: The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, Beauty’s Punishment, and Beauty’s Release and two under the name Anne Rampling: Exit to Eden and Belinda. After her husband’s death (2002) A. Rice has announced that he would write “only for the Lord.” and has began a series chronicling the life of Jesus . [Kirsten Dunst (Claudia), Antonio Banderas (Armand) e Christian Slater (Daniel Molloy, il giornalista).

Brunonia Barry (?) from Massachusetts, studied literature and creative writing, she spent a year living in Dublin and auditing Trinity College classes on James Joyce’s Ulysses and worked as theatre promoter in Chicago. She made her literary debut with the bestselling gothic novel The Lace Reader (2008) a “richly imagined saga of passion, suspense, and magic” (Time Magazine) narrated by a woman from an enigmatic Salem family who can foretell the future in patterns of lace. The Map of True Places (2010)is her second novel of tragedy, secrets, identity, and love, the tale of a psychotherapist who discovers the strands of her own life in the death of a troubled patient.

Christopher Paolini (1983), after graduating at the age of 15, started working as a writer. His novel his Eragon (2002, Stefen Fangmeier’s movie – 2006) was the first of a series, the Inheritance Cycle, set in the mythical land of Alagaësia which include Eldest, Brisingr, and a currently untitled fourth book. The novels centres on a teenage boy, Eragon, one of the few remaining Dragon Riders, and his dragon Saphira.

Adventures novels
Clive Eric Cussler (1931 -), member of the National Underwater Marine Agency (NUMA) and marine archaeologist, has discovered more than sixty shipwreck sites. He writes thriller novels mainly based on the sea. Its most popular series is the Dirk Pitt adventure novels , featuring as a protagonist Major Dirk Pitt of the United States Air Force now part of The National Underwater and Marine Agency as Special Projects Director. The first of these novel appeared in 1973, The Mediterranean Caper, (U. K. MAYDAY!), the latest, Crescent Dawn (2010). Other series are NUMA Files adventure novels, focused on Kurt Austin, Team Leader of NUMA’s Special Assignments division and his adventures; The Oregon Files, set on a ship named Oregon; Isaac Bell tales, set in the early part of the 20th century; Fargo Adventures, about two professional treasure hunters. Two of his novels have been adapted for the cinema: Raise the Titanic written in 1976 and turned into a movie by Jerry Jameson in 1980 and Sahara, the eleventh book in Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series , written in 1992 and directed by Breck Eisner in 2005.

Short story writers
David Sedaris (1956 – ) is a humorist, writer, comedian, bestselling author, and radio contributor.
His first collection of essays and short stories, Barrel Fever, appeared in 1994 followed by Naked (1997), Holidays on Ice (1997), Me Talk Pretty One Day (2000), Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim (2004), and When You Are Engulfed in Flames (2008), and Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary ( 2010). Much of Sedaris’s humor is autobiographical and often concerns his family life, his middle class upbringing, his Greek heritage, various jobs, education, drug use, homosexuality, and his life in France with his boyfriend, Hugh Hamrick.

James Sallis (Arkansas) is an American crime writer, poet and musician, best known for his series of novels featuring the character Lew Griffin and set in New Orleans.
He is the brother of philosopher John Sallis.
The Lew Griffin Books
The Long-Legged Fly (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1992. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 1996)
Moth (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1993. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 1996. New York: Walker & Co, 2003)
Black Hornet (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 1994. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 1997. New York: Walker & Co, 2003)
Eye of the Cricket (New York: Walker & Co, 1997 & 2000. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 1998)
Bluebottle (New York: Walker & Co, 1999. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 1999)
The Long-Legged Fly/Moth Omnibus Edition (Harpenden: No Exit Press, 2000).
Ghost of a Flea (New York: Walker & Co, 2001 & 2000. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 2001)
Other Novels
Renderings (Seattle, Washington: Black Heron Press, 1995).
Death Will Have Your Eyes (New York: St Martins Press, 1997. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 1997).
Cypress Grove (New York: Walker & Co, 2003. Harpenden: No Exit Press, 2003).
Drive (Scottsdale, AZ: Poisoned Pen Press, 2005).
Cripple Creek (New York: Walker & Co, 2006).
Salt River (New York: Walker & Co, 2007).
The Killer Is Dying (New York: Walker & Co, 2011).
[edit]Short Stories & Poetry Collections

A Few Last Words’ (New York: Macmillan, 1970).
Limits of the Sensible World (Austin, Texas: Host Publications, 1994).
Time’s Hammers: Collected Stories (Edgbaston, Birmingham: Toxic, 2000).
Sorrow’s Kitchen (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2000).
A City Equal to My Desire (Point Blank Press, 2004).

Kim Edwards (born 1958) is an American author and educator. Her first novel, The Memory Keeper’s Daughter (2005), is a New York Times Bestseller, and was honored with the Sainsbury’s Popular Fiction Award[1] at the 2008 British Book Awards.
She wrote the short story collection, The Secrets of a Fire King (1997), which was an alternate for the 1998 PEN/Hemingway Award, and has won both a Whiting Award[2] and the Nelson Algren Award.[3] A graduate of Colgate University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she currently teaches writing at the University of Kentucky.[4]
Her most recent novel, The Lake of Dreams, New York Times Bestseller,[5] was published in January 2011.[6][7]

Nicholas Charles Sparks (born December 31, 1965) is an internationally-bestselling American novelist and screenwriter. He has 16 published novels, with themes that include cancer, death and love. Six have been adapted to film, including Message in a Bottle, A Walk to Remember, The Notebook, Nights in Rodanthe, Dear John and The Last Song. Two more are in various stages of development. The Lucky One is expected to be released as a film in early 2012. “Safe Haven” is expected to begin filming in 2011.Nicholas Sparks was born on December 31, 1965, in Omaha, Nebraska, to Patrick Michael Sparks, a professor, and Jill Emma Marie (née Thoene) Sparks, a homemaker and an optometrist’s assistant. He was the middle of three children, with an older brother Michael Earl “Micah” Sparks (1964–) and a younger sister, Danielle “Dana” Sparks (1966–2000), who died at the age of 33. Sparks has said that she is the inspiration for the main character in his novel A Walk to Remember.Sparks was raised Roman Catholic[1] and is of German, Czech, English and Irish ancestry.[2] He and his wife are devout Catholics, and are raising their children in the Catholic faith. “I was raised Catholic, baptized, confirmed, Sunday School, went to Notre Dame, go to confession, go to church weekly,” the author says. “My oldest son is an altar boy. All my children go to the Catholic school. My wife Catherine was raised Catholic. We were married in the Catholic Church. God is the most important thing in our lives. I suppose that’s true of everybody’s lives, whether or not they want to believe it.”[3]His father was pursuing graduate studies, and the family moved a great deal, so by the time Sparks was 8, he had lived in Watertown, Minnesota, Los Angeles, and Grand Island, Nebraska. In 1974 his family settled in Fair Oaks, California, and remained there through Nicholas’s high school days. He graduated in 1984 as valedictorian from Bella Vista High School, then enrolling at the University of Notre Dame, having received a full track and field scholarship. In his freshman year, his team set a record for the 4 x 800 relay.[citation needed] Sparks majored in business finance and graduated with honors in 1988. He also met his future wife that year, Cathy Cote from New Hampshire, while they were both on spring break. They married on July 22, 1989 and moved to Sacramento, California.[4]While still in school in 1985 , Sparks had penned his first (never published) novel, The Passing, while home for the summer between freshman and sophomore years at Notre Dame. He wrote another novel in 1989, also unpublished, The Royal Murders.After college, Sparks sought work with publishers or to attend law school, but was rejected in both attempts. He then spent the next three years trying other careers, including real estate appraisal, waiting tables, selling dental products by phone and starting his own manufacturing business.[5]In 1990, Sparks co-wrote with Billy Mills Wokini: A Lakota Journey to Happiness and Self-Understanding.[6] The book was published by Feather Publishing, Random House, and Hay House. Sales for this book approximated 50,000 copies in its first year after release. In 1992, Sparks began selling pharmaceuticals and in 1993 was transferred to Greenville, SC. It was there that he wrote another novel in his spare time, The Notebook.[8] Two years later, he was discovered by literary agent Theresa Park, who picked The Notebook out of her agency’s slush pile, liked it, and offered to represent him. In October 1995, Park secured a $1 million advance for The Notebook from Time Warner Book Group. The novel was published in October 1996 and made the New York Times best-seller list in its first week of release.With the success of his first novel, he moved to New Bern, NC. After his first publishing success, he wrote several international bestsellers. Six of his novels have been made into films: Message in a Bottle (1999), A Walk to Remember (2002), The Notebook (2004), Nights in Rodanthe (2008), Dear John (2010), and The Last Song (2010). Via his Twitter, “The Lucky One” will be released in March or April of 2012.[9]According to his website, he has also sold the screenplay adaptations of True Believer and At First Sight, though it’s uncertain whether either film will be made.[10] His latest screenplay turned novel, The Last Song, has been turned into a film produced by Offspring Entertainment for Touchstone Pictures featuring Miley Cyrus.Sparks began his 16th novel, Safe Haven, on February 17, 2010, and it was published on September 14, 2010. Film producers asked Sparks on August 4 for rights to release a movie adaptation of this new novel and the deal was closed the next day.[11]

On June 17, 2011 Nicholas Sparks stated on his official website that Warner Bros. had bought the movie rights to his new book ‘The Best Of Me’ which is coming out October 11, 2011. The production date for the movie hasn’t been verified, although Sparks believes that filming of the movie will start in 2012.[12]
On August 2, 2011, Nicholas Sparks cited via his Twitter page that Safe Haven should begin production some time in October of 2011. He also confirmed that ‘The Lucky One’, starring Zac Efron, should be in theaters in either March or April of 2012.

works: The Notebook (October 1996)

Message in a Bottle (April 1998)
A Walk to Remember (October 1999)
The Rescue (September 2000)
A Bend in the Road (September 2001)
Nights in Rodanthe (September 2002)
The Guardian (April 2003)
The Wedding (September 2003)
Three Weeks With My Brother (April 2004) – A non-fiction account of traveling with his brother after the men lost both parents and their sister in quick succession.
True Believer (April 2005)
At First Sight (October 2006)
The Choice (September 2007)
Dear John (October 2007)
The Lucky One (October 2008)
The Last Song (September 2009)
Safe Haven (September 2010)
The Best Of Me (October 11, 2011)
[edit]Film adaptations

Message in a Bottle (February 12, 1999)
A Walk to Remember (January 25, 2002)
The Notebook (June 25, 2004)
Nights in Rodanthe (September 26, 2008)
Dear John (February 5, 2010)
The Last Song (March 31, 2010)
The Lucky One (In production)
Safe Haven (film) Set to be released in 2012
The Best of Me (film) Warner Brothers bought copyright Friday July 17, 2011

Raymond Carver (1938 – 1988) was born in Oregon on 25 May 1938. He grew up in Washington State. His father was a sawmill worker and his mother a waitress.
Carver worked with his father in a sawmill in California and then as a deliveryman. He married his first wife—Maryann—and six months later a daughter was born. A son followed.
Carver enrolled at various colleges, where his studies concentrated on creative writing. Aged twenty-two, “The Furious Seasons”—his first published story—appeared in college magazine Selection. “The Brass Ring”—his first published poem—appeared in 1962, in the little magazine Targets.
In his late twenties, Carver filed for bankruptcy. His father died. He also got his first white collar job (textbook editor), his story “Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?” appeared in The Best American Short Stories 1967, and a college press published the poems Near Klamath—his first book.
Carver continued to move around, move jobs, and get stories and poems published. He began to lecture. He went bankrupt again and was hospitalized with acute alcoholism. In his late thirties, the stories Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? appeared—his first major-press book. Carver stopped drinking. He met Tess Gallagher, and he and Maryann separated. The American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters awarded him a fellowship to write full-time. At forty-nine, doctors diagnosed cancer. They removed part of his left lung, but the cancer recurred. He had brain radiation treatment, but cancer reappeared.
Ray and Tess married in Reno, on Friday 17 June 1988. He died at home, in Washington State, on 2 August.
Fiction
Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? McGraw-Hill, 1976
Furious Seasons And Other Stories Capra Press, 1977
What We Talk About When We Talk About Love Knopf, 1981
Cathedral Knopf, 1983
The Stories Of Raymond Carver Picador, 1985
Where I’m Calling From: The Selected Stories Atlantic Monthly Press, 1988
Elephant (1988) comprises the new stories from Where I’m Calling From: The Selected Stories.

Poetry
All Of Us: The Collected Poems The Harvill Press, 1996
Fires (1983)
Where Water Comes Together With Other Water (1985)
Ultramarine (1986)
A New Path To The Waterfall (1989)
Uncollected Poems: No Heroics, Please (1991)
Poems in All Of Us: The Collected Poems also appear in the following collections: Near Klamath (1968), Winter Insomnia (1970), At Night The Salmon Move (1976), This Water (1985), Early For The Dance (1986), Those Days: Early Writings By Raymond Carver: Eleven Poems And A Story (1987), In A Marine Light: Selected Poems (1987).
Other Collections
Fires: Essays, Poems, Stories Vintage Books, 1989
Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Prose The Harvill Press, 2000
No Heroics, Please (1991) comprises essays, poems and stories that can be found in Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction And Prose and All Of Us: The Collected Poems. Short Cuts (1993) comprises the nine stories—from Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?, What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, Cathedral—and poem “Lemonade” that formed the basis of Robert Altman’s film. Introduction by Altman.

Sue Miller (born November 29, 1943 in Chicago) is an American writer who has authored a number of best-selling novels.[1] Her duties as a single mother left her with little time to write for many years, and as a result she did not publish her first novel until 1986, after spending almost a decade in various fellowships and teaching positions. Since then, two of her novels have been made into feature films, and her book While I Was Gone was an Oprah’s Book Club pick in 2000. Sue Miller is now a professor at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts where she teaches creative writing classes.

The Good Mother (1986), made into a movie in 1988
Inventing the Abbotts (1987), made into a movie in 1997
Family Pictures (1990)
For Love (1993)
The Distinguished Guest (1995)
While I Was Gone (1999)
The World Below (2001)
Lost in the Forest (2005)
The Senator’s Wife (2008)
The Lake Shore Limited (2010)
[edit]Nonfiction books

The Story of My Father (2004)

Tom Coraghessan Boyle (born Thomas John Boyle, also known as T.C. Boyle, born on December 2, 1948) is a U.S. novelist and short story writer. Since the mid 1970s, he has published twelve novels and more than 100 short stories. He won the PEN/Faulkner award in 1988,[1] for his third novel, World’s End, which recounts 300 years in upstate New York.
Boyle grew up in Peekskill, New York,[2] received a B.A. from the State University of New York at Potsdam, and a M.F.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Southern California.[3]
Many of Boyle’s novels and short stories explore the baby boom generation, its appetites, joys, and addictions. His themes, such as the often-misguided efforts of the male hero and the slick appeal of the anti-hero, appear alongside brutal satire, humor, and magic realism. His fiction also explores the ruthlessness and the unpredictability of nature and the toll human society unwittingly takes on the environment.[4] His novels include World’s End (1987, winner of the Pen/Faulkner Award for Fiction); The Road to Wellville (1993);[5] and The Tortilla Curtain (1995, winner of France’s Prix Médicis étranger).[6][citation needed]
Boyle has published eight collections of short stories, including Descent of Man (1979), Greasy Lake (1985), If the River was Whiskey (1989), and Without a Hero (1994). His short stories regularly appear in the major American magazines, including The New Yorker,[7] Harper’s,[8] Esquire, The Atlantic Monthly and Playboy, as well as on the radio show, Selected Shorts. The Tortilla Curtain (1995) is a novel by U.S. author T.C. Boyle about middle-class values, illegal immigration, a fear and hatred of foreigners, poverty, and environmental destruction. Of the twelve novels Boyle has written so far, The Tortilla Curtain has turned out to be his most successful.

Kim Edwards (born 1958) is an American author and educator. Her first novel, The Memory Keeper’s Daughter (2005), is a New York Times Bestseller, and was honored with the Sainsbury’s Popular Fiction Award[1] at the 2008 British Book Awards.
She wrote the short story collection, The Secrets of a Fire King (1997), which was an alternate for the 1998 PEN/Hemingway Award, and has won both a Whiting Award[2] and the Nelson Algren Award.[3] A graduate of Colgate University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she currently teaches writing at the University of Kentucky.[4]
Her most recent novel, The Lake of Dreams, New York Times Bestseller,[5] was published in January 2011.[6][7]
[edit]References

Anchee Min (1957) is a Chinese-American painter, photographer, musician, and author who lives in San Francisco and Shanghai. Min’s memoir, Red Azalea, and her subsequent novels are either semiautobiographical or reflect a particular time in Chinese history with an emphasis on strong female characters, most notably Jiang Qing, the wife of Chairman Mao Zedong, and Empress Dowager Cixi, the last ruling empress of China.
Born in Shanghai on January 14, 1957, Min was sent to a labor camp at seventeen where she was discovered by talent scouts.[1] She worked as an actress at the Shanghai Film Studio and went to the United States in 1984 with the help of actress Joan Chen. She is married to author Lloyd Lofthouse.
In May 2011, she was interviewed by Jim Peck on Milwaukee Public Television’s interview show I Remember.[2] Fiction
Katherine (1995)
Becoming Madame Mao (2001)
Wild Ginger (2002)
Empress Orchid (2004)
The Last Empress (2007)
Pearl of China (2010)

Glenn Cooper
Cresciuto a White Plains, città alla periferia di New York, si è laureato in archeologia alla Harvard University e in medicina alla Tufts University School of Medicine.
In seguito ha lavorato nel campo dell’industria farmacologica, diventando presidente e amministratore delegato di un’importante azienda di biotecnologie del Massachusetts.
Nel 2009 ha pubblicato il suo primo libro, Library of the Dead, edito in Italia come La biblioteca dei morti dalla Editrice Nord. Il romanzo è stato inoltre tradotto in altri 22 paesi.
Cooper è anche sceneggiatore e produttore cinematografico. La sua casa di produzione, la Lascaux Pictures, ha prodotto il suo primo film, Long Distance, distribuito al Tribeca Film Festival.
Nel maggio 2010 è uscito Il libro delle anime (Book of Souls), atteso sequel del suo romanzo precedente, sempre con Will Piper come protagonista.
Nel maggio 2010, è uscito in Inghilterra il terzo libro dello scrittore, The Tenth Chamber, uscito in Italia il 20 gennaio 2011 e tradotto come La mappa del destino.
Nell’ottobre 2011, uscirà, in Gran Bretagna e in Italia, il nuovo libro dello scrittore dal titolo The Devil Will Come. Il libro sarà ambientato in Italia e parla di una giovane e bella suora italiana che tenta di sventare un antichissimo complotto che riguarda la Profezia di Malachia e può distruggere il Vaticano. Il titolo italiano è Il Marchio del Diavolo.

Rob Reger
Emily the Strange is an advertising mascot character by Rob Reger for his company Cosmic Debris Etc. Inc. She first appeared on a sticker distributed at concerts, record stores and skate shops to promote Cosmic Debris, the clothing line founded by artist and skateboarder Rob Reger, racecar driver Matt Reed and Nathan Carrico, who designed Emily in 1991 for Santa Cruz Skateboards in Santa Cruz, California.
Emily the Strange is published in several formats by world renowned publishers including Chronicle Books, Dark Horse Comics and, most recently, HarperCollins.
The Chronicle Books hardback graphic novellas include:
Emily the Strange (2001)
Emily’s Secret Book of Strange (2003)
Emily’s Good Nightmares (2004)
Emily’s Seeing is Deceiving (2006)
The first HarperCollins novel, Emily the Strange: The Lost Days, was released in June, 2009. Written in a diary format, it opens with Emily attempting to recover her memory and regain her sense of style.
2nd: Emily the Strange: Stranger and Stranger, was released in March, 2010. In this book Emily is back in Blandindulle and preparing to move to a new town. While experimenting with her supply of Black rock and duplicating device she accidentally clones herself. Enjoying the benefit of a second Emily at first, the real Emily comes across problems such as identity crisis, loss of some of her unique talents, and an increase in nose picking. Not to mention the fact that her clone thinks she’s the real Emily and evidently plans to end Emily Strange for good.
3rd: Emily the Strange: Dark Times was released on December 28, 2010. Emily is in Duntztown when she needs a student ID to obtain a discount at the local hardware store. After going to school and borrowing an ID, she decides to homeschool herself literally, as opposed to lying about it in the past two books. During a seminar “History of the Strange Family 101”, Emily finds out that Great-Aunt Lily died by white fever at age 13, though she had healing powers and could probably heal herself. A rumor that a Dark Aunt caused her death is spreading too. Emily goes to Blackrock to find black rock for her Time Out Machine, only to find that Blackrock’s not there and that the caravan is with her. She learns about Boris, Attikol’s ancestor, and decides to time travel into 1790 to save Lily and take Boris off her tail using a moving, severed cat’s tail.
4th and final HarperCollins book, Emily the Strange: Piece of Mind will be released December 27th, 2011.

 

RICHARD HARVELL was born in New Hampshire, USA, and studied English literature at Dartmouth College. He now lives in Basel, Switzerland, with his wife and children. The Bells is his first novel.

L’esatta melodia dell’aria è un romanzo di formazione con un’ambientazione storica molto suggestiva (1700, Abbazia di San Gallo, Vienna e Venezia) e in cui la musica e i suoni hanno un’influenza straordinaria nella vita del protagonista, Moses.
Leggendo la sua storia, difficile ma anche straordinaria, che Moses racconta in prima persona, è inevitabile ripensare a Jean-Baptiste Grenouille del Profumo di Suskind, dove a guidare la vita del protagonista è l’olfatto, ma con risvolti ben diversi da questa storia.
La trama.
Per Moses, il mondo non è fatto di oggetti, di colori, di odori: è fatto di suoni. I suoni lo accompagnano per le strade del piccolo villaggio nel Canton d’Uri, in Svizzera, dove la gente lo evita come fosse un appestato. I suoni lo accarezzano durante le scorribande solitarie nei campi e lungo il fiume che serpeggia tra la valle. I suoni lo avvolgono sul campanile della chiesa, dove vive con la madre, reietta sordomuta che, notte e giorno, fa vibrare le campane più potenti che mai siano state costruite. Eppure Moses non è il suo nome. Lui un nome non c’è l’ha mai avuto. Così l’hanno chiamato due monaci dopo averlo tratto in salvo dalle acque del fiume, destinate a essere la sua tomba. Perché quel bambino doveva tacere per sempre, lui, il frutto del peccato del prete del paese.
E invece per Moses inizia una nuova vita, lontano dalla madre e dalle campane. Una vita nel grandioso monastero di San Gallo. Ma sono ancora i suoni a guidarlo: prima verso il coro della chiesa, di cui entrerà a far parte, poi nella casa di una ragazzina troppo sola che vede nello straordinario talento canoro di quel bambino l’unica cura per la malattia della madre. E, infine, i suoni lo legano alla volontà di padre Ullrich, il maestro del coro, che, inebriato dalla voce perfetta di Moses, decide di renderla eterna, incorruttibile. Un atto che stravolge ancora una volta la vita di un uomo nato per cogliere l’esatta melodia dell’aria e cresciuto schiavo della musica, che gli concederà fama e successo, ma che gli toglierà l’amore.

John Barrett McInerney Jr. (1955) is an American writer. His novels include Bright Lights, Big City; Ransom; Story of My Life; Brightness Falls; and The Last of the Savages. He edited The Penguin Book of New American Voices, wrote the screenplay for the 1988 film adaptation of Bright Lights, Big City, and co-wrote the screenplay for the television film Gia, which starred Angelina Jolie. He was the wine columnist for House & Garden magazine, and his essays on wine have been collected in Bacchus & Me (2000) and A Hedonist in the Cellar (2006). His most recent novel is titled The Good Life, published in 2006, and since April 2010 he is a wine columnist for The Wall Street Journal. McInerney studied writing with Raymond Carver and once worked as a fact-checker at The New Yorker. He achieved fame with his first published novel Bright Lights, Big City. Published in 1984, the novel was unique at the time for its depiction of cocaine culture in second-person narrative. The title is taken from a 1961 blues song by Jimmy Reed. The novel established McInerney’s reputation as part of a new generation of writers. Labelled the ‘literary brat pack’ in a 1987 article in the Village Voice, McInerney, Bret Easton Ellis and Tama Janowitz were presented as the new face of literature: young, iconoclastic and fresh. Five novels followed in rapid succession: Ransom, Story of My Life, Brightness Falls, The Last of the Savages and Model Behavior. After the success of Bright Lights, Big City, publishers started looking for similar works about young people in urban settings. Ellis’s Less Than Zero, published in 1985, was promoted as following McInerney’s example. McInerney, Ellis and Janowitz were based in New York City and their lives there were regular literary themes, chronicled by New York media.
Ellis used McInerney’s character, Alison Poole (Story of My Life), in his novels American Psycho and Glamorama. McInerney revealed that the character of Alison Poole is based upon his former girlfriend, Rielle Hunter, then known as Lisa Druck. He described the character as “cocaine addled,” and “sexually voracious” but also treated her with some sympathy. McInerney’s roman a clef opened a prescient glimpse into the notorious horse murders scandal, which did not become known to the public until 1992, when Sports Illustrated magazine published a confession from the man who had murdered Lisa Druck’s horse at her father’s behest, in order to claim the insurance on its life
McInerney also has a cameo role in Ellis’s Lunar Park, attending the Halloween party Bret hosts at his house. It was later revealed that McInerney was not pleased with his representation in the novel.
Throughout his career McInerney has struggled against the strong, almost indelible, image of himself as both the author and protagonist of Bright Lights, Big City. He recently appeared at Williams College as the Commencement speaker for the Class of 2010.
Fiction: Bright Lights, Big City (1984), Ransom (1985),Story of My Life (1988),Brightness Falls (1992),The Last of the Savages (1997),Model Behavior (1998),The Good Life (2006),How It Ended (short story collection) (2009)
Nonfiction: Bacchus and Me: Adventures in the Wine Cellar (2000),A Hedonist in the Cellar: Adventures in Wine (2006)

John Stephens is an American television producer, screenwriter and director best known for his work on The O.C., Gilmore Girls and Gotham. He should not be confused with veteran TV producer John G. Stephens, who was born in 1929.
Stephens is credited as the producer of twenty-five episodes of drama series The O.C., and as co-produced of the six episodes of dramedy series Gilmore Girls and written eight episodes,
In June, 2008, it was revealed that he had been hired to be executive producer of Gossip Girl.
He is the author of the children’s fantasy series The Books of Beginning, the first one called The Emerald Atlas and the second The Fire Chronicle.[The third book is named The Black Reckoning.
The book, which is the first in a trilogy, tells the story of three children who grow up in a series of orphanages after being mysteriously abandoned by their parents. Yet they discover a strange “atlas” which leads them into a magical – and dangerous -world.
THE ADIRONDACKS – The Emerald Atlas is set in a part state New York known as the A dacks. This is an area that Ste knows well and, he says, it is one few in the United States with a streerary history. He is quoted as savin finding inspiration for fantasy ne probably easier for British writers l Rowling and Philip Pullman than Americans.
PLOT – The Emerald Atlas tells the story of three children. Kate, Michael and Emma. When they are very young their parents hand them over1 to a strange gentleman. No explanation is given, although their mother tells the oldest child. Kate: “Remember your father and I love you very much. And we will ali be together again. I promise.” The children spend the next 10 years in a series of orphanages. In one of them they discover an emerald atlas that has magical powers. The children realise that they have been chosen to save the world. They must fight against an evil witoh2 and her demons, but they are helped by Gabriel, a warrior ‘ f rom a lost tribe, and a wizard4, Dr. Stanislaus Pym. The book is the first in a trilogy.

Stephen King
works
Many of King’s novels and short stories have been made into major motion pictures or TV movies and miniseries.
Movies
Carrie (1976) by Brian de Palma.
Salem’s Lot is a 1979 by Tobe Hooper.
The Shining (1980), directed by Stanley Kubrick .
The Dead Zone (1983) by David Cronenberg
The Dark Half by George A. Romero (1993)
The Lawnmower Man (1992), by Brett Leonard, a movie that bore no resemblance to King’s original short story.
Christine (1983) by John Carpenter
Desperation (2006) television movie, directed by frequent King collaborator Mick Garrii
Dolores Claiborne 1995 by Taylor Hackford.
Firestarter 1984, directed by Mark L. Lester
Stand By Me (1986, adaptation of the novella The Body), directed by Rob Reiner.
Misery (1990) by Rob Reiner.
The Green Mile (1999) by Frank Darabont .

S. King made brief apparitions (cameos) in
Creepshow (1982), about a backwoods redneck who, after touching a fallen meteor in hopes of selling it, grows moss all over his body. Here he also acted as in
Pet Sematary, a 1989 horror film, directed by Mary Lambert.

Television
It (1990) horror mini-series by Tommy Lee Fallace
the Shining miniseries adapted by director Mick Garris, the series was first aired in 1997
The Langoliers (1995).
The Golden Years, a made-for-TV movie (1962-78)
Chappelle’s Show (2003), an American comedy television series created by Dave Chappelle and Neal Brennan,
The Simpsons written by John Frink & Don Payne and directed by Bob Anderson in the episode Insane Clown Poppy (2000)
Rose Red, a television miniseries broadcasted in 2002 directed by Craig R. Baxley. The story is about a parapsychologist and a team of psychics who investigate on a mansion, red Rose.
The Stand (1994), a television movie directed by Mick Garris.

He produced and acted in a miniseries, Kingdom Hospital, which is based on the Danish miniseries Riget by Lars von Trier. He also co-wrote The X-Files season 5 episode Chinga with the creator of the series Chris Carter.
King has granted permission to student filmmakers to make adaptations of his short stories for one dollar (see Dollar Baby).
The television network TNT recently announced it would be adapting The Talisman into a six-part mini-series, which is expected to air during the summer of 2008. Steven Spielberg and Kathleen Kennedy will be collaborating on the miniseries project.

Katherine Min was born in Champagne, Illinois, and grew up near Albany, NY. An incorrigible liar as a child, she made the logical transition to fiction writing. Her novel, SECONDHAND WORLD, was published by Alfred A. Knopf, in 2006. She was a finalist for the 2007 PEN/Bingham Award for “an exceptionally talented writer whose debut work represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.”
Min currently teaches at the University of North Carolina in Asheville. She is working on her second novel, THE FETISHIST, about Asian fetishism in the world of classical music.

Philip Pullman (1946 -), best-selling author of several books, most notably his trilogy of fantasy novels, His Dark Materials, which includes Northern Lights (1995, The Golden Compass inUS), The Subtle Knife (1997), and The Amber Spyglass (2000). It follows the coming-of-age of two children, Lyra Belacqua and Will Parry, while wandering through a series of parallel universes among epic events. It was made into the film The Golden Compass (2007) directed by Chris Weitz starring Dakota Blue, Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig . Another series is about Sally Lockhart which started with The Ruby in the Smoke (1985) and ended with The Tin Princess (1994). Sally Lockhart is a young business woman with a passion for solving mystery. The series New-Cut Gang is about a group of rascal who fights with gangsters, pickpockets, charlatans, horse thieves in 1892. It consists of two novels, Thunderbolt’s Waxwork (1994) and The Gasfitter’s Ball (1995).

Pullman then wrote a fictional biography of Jesus, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ (2010). In 2008 he published the comics The Adventures of John Blake in the David Fickling Books for children and in 2012 Fairy Tales From The Brothers Grim. For the theatre he wrote: Frankenstein(1992) and Sherlock Holmes and the Limehouse Horror (1992)

1998 The Butterfly Tattoo (re-issue of The White Mercedes)

1999 I was a Rat! or The Scarlet Slippers

2000 Puss in Boots: The Adventures of That Most Enterprising Feline

2004 The Scarecrow and his Servant

The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ (part of the Canongate Myth series)

Tom Clancy (1947)is the popular American author of “techno-thrillers”, novels of political and military intrigue and complex geopolitical themes mingled with remarkably accurate details of modern high-tech military hardware. He’s also written several highly respected non-fiction guides to military history and hardware. Clancy himself turned 18 as Vietnam War casualties were mounting, but never served in the military. College students were exempt from the military draft, and Clancy studied at Loyola College before becoming an insurance broker.

His first novel, The Hunt For Red October, was published in 1984, and featured Clancy’s frequent protagonist, Jack Ryan, a bright, stalwart, and heroic operative for the CIA. Ryan has also been central to Clancy’s Patriot Games (1987) Clear and Present Danger (1989), The Sum of All Fears (1991), Debt of Honor (1994), Executive Orders (1996), The Bear and the Dragon (2001), and Red Rabbit (2002). Clancy has also written several novels featuring a different but just as bright, stalwart, and heroic CIA operative, John Clark. Clancy’s Clark novels include The Cardinal of the Kremlin (1988), Without Remorse (1993), and Rainbow Six (1998). The latter was written and released to coincide with the video game of the same name.

Ryan and Clark sometimes appear in each other’s books. Several of Clancy’s novels have been adapted to the big screen, and Ryan has been played by Alec Baldwin, Harrison Ford, and Ben Affleck, while Clark has been played by Willem Dafoe. Clancy also written about Jack Ryan’s father, war hero, and about Ryan’s son, Jack Ryan, Jr., a heroic figure in national security crises set a generation in the future.

Clancy’s military plotting and scenarios are considered so plausible that his books, fiction and non-fiction, are particularly popular in the US military and intelligence agencies. He has been invited to lecture at the Pentagon several times, and Department of Defense officials regularly offer Clancy un-classified background briefings on upcoming weapons projects.

Clancy’s fiction takes an earnestly favorable view of law enforcement and the U.S. military, and his later novels have been more political, allowing the author to voice his generally conservative beliefs. He’s also spoken out to the media on some issues. In the aftermath of September 11, Clancy appeared on The O’Reilly Factor, and explained why this disaster had happened:

The general difference between conservatives and liberals is that liberals like pretty pictures and conservatives like to build bridges that people can drive across. And conservatives are indeed conservative because if the bridge falls down then people die, whereas the liberals figure, we can always build a nice memorial and make people forget it ever happened and was our fault. They’re very good at making people forget it was their fault. All right?

The CIA was gutted by people on the political left who don’t like intelligence operations… And as a result of that, as an indirect result of that, we’ve lost 5,000 citizens last week.

Condoleezza Rice, George W. Bush’s National Security Advisor, is apparently not a Clancy fan. She’s said several times that “No-one could have imagined [terrorists] taking a plane, slamming it into the Pentagon … [or] into the World Trade Center, using planes as a missile…” But Clancy did. In Debt of Honor, a Japanese kamikaze pilot intentionally crashes an airliner into the U.S. Capitol, killing the President, most of the Senate and House of Representatives, and the entire U.S. Supreme Court. The book, published in 1994, was a huge bestseller, like all of Clancy’s fiction.

Clancy is married to Alexandra Llewellyn, first cousin to Colin Powell. Powell actually introduced Clancy to Llewellyn, while Clancy was still happily married to his first wife.

In the 1990s, Clancy started Red Storm Entertainment, a multimedia company specializing in computer games. His name now appears above several popular video game titles, including Splinter Cell, Ghost Recon, Rogue Spear, and Rainbow Six. Clancy has also branded several lines of books with his name — Tom Clancy’s Net Force, Tom Clancy’s Op-Center, and Tom Clancy’s Power Plays. The books are written and credited to other authors, with plotlines and premises under Clancy’s supervision.

He’s part owner of the Baltimore Orioles baseball team, and also owns a tank.

WORKS

The Hunt for Red October (1984, novel)

Red Storm Rising (1986, novel, with Larry Bond)

Patriot Games (1987, novel)

Clear and Present Danger (1989, novel)

Sum of All Fears (1991, novel)

Without Remorse (1993, novel)

Debt of Honor (1994, novel)

SSN (1996, novel)

Executive Orders (1996, novel)

Rainbow Six (1998, novel)

The Bear and the Dragon (2000, novel)

Red Rabbit (2002, novel)

Teeth of the Tiger (2003, novel)

Paul Yoon (1980 -) , American writer , is currently teaching at the faculty of the Bennington Writing Seminars and lives in Baltimore with the author Laura van den Berg. His first winner prize book was the the short story collection Once the Shore (2009) followed by novel Snow hunters (2013)

Descrizione

Il tempo sospeso in terra straniera. E l’attesa dell’amore tra l’oceano e le stelle. Un giovane prigioniero di guerra nordcoreano, ribattezzato Yohan dagli americani, viene mandato via nave in Brasile perché si ricostruisca una vita dopo gli orrori di un conflitto che ha finora poco interessato la letteratura. Grazie all’abilità manuale di cui ha dato prova al campo, viene assegnato come aiutante alla bottega di un sarto giapponese, a sua volta emigrato, a sua volta spaesato. Unico legame con l’altro capo del mondo, uno dei marinai sudcoreani della nave che fa scalo a intervalli regolari nel porto. E unico interlocutore l’uomo di mezza età che taglia e cuce pazientemente nella piccola, spartana bottega. Interlocutore silenzioso, e non solo per problemi linguistici, il sarto trasmette a Yohan, insieme alla sua arte, anche la malinconica serenità raggiunta negli anni. I due tacciono su un passato drammatico: il lettore viene a conoscere quello del ragazzo tramite una serie di flashback che rivelano con parole scarne gli orrori della guerra, dello sradicamento e della prigionia, mitigata solo dalla compagnia di un amico più sfortunato. Nelle sue pagine Paul Yoon comunica la sensazione che tutto, anche il dolore estremo, anche la solitudine, si possa raccontare senza toni eccessivi, addirittura con leggerezza. Ed è grazie al silenzio leggero, colmo di gentilezza, saggezza ed empatia, del sarto, e all’incontro con due straordinari ragazzi di strada brasiliani, che Yohan a poco a poco comincia a rinascere, a creare legami di affetto, e perfino a sognare. L’atmosfera magica della storia, evocativa di quelle dei grandi romanzieri sudamericani, ma del tutto originale, non toglie nulla al realismo crudo della situazione dei due uomini, o dei due bambini, ma la inserisce in un percorso di speranza che porterà il romanzo a una conclusione felice.

Donna Tartt was born in 1963 in Mississippi and was brought up in a bookish family quite eccentric. She left Mississippi for Bennington College, New England, in 1982 where she studied Classics and began writing her first book, The Secret History which became a best seller. Ethereal, ageless, very feminine in her masculine clothes Donna tart has written other two books after her first success, all of them mysterious like herself: The Little Friend (2002), and The Goldfinch (2013) for which she has won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize (Fiction). The plot of the Goldfinch follows the life of a young boy in New York City, Theo Decker, who miraculously survives an accident while his mother dies. Theo starts moving to his friends’ apartments and through the city streets. Amazon describes the novel as “ a haunted odyssey through present-day America. It is a story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the enormous power of art”. Her stories remind Charles Dickens’s novella, but she admits her admiration also for the Russian and for the Irish writers, including Oscar Wilde, Frank O’Connor, Flann O’Brien and Edna O’Brien.

Azar Nafisi (1947 – ), Iranian academic and writer, is the daughter of Ahmad Nafisi, mayor (sindaco) of Tehran from 1961 to 1963. After studying in America, she went back to Iran and taught (insegnò) English literature at the University of Tehran. When Ayatollah Khomeini took the power, she could not accept the restrictive rules (regole restrittive) imposed upon women and, in 1995, stopped teaching at the university, and gave regular lessons to seven of her female students (studentesse donne) at her house, every Thursday morning. They studied books seen as controversial in the Iranian society, including Lolita, Madame Bovary and novels by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Henry James and Jane Austen, giving an interpretation from an Iranian point of view (punto di vista). In 1997 Nafisi moved to the United States, where she wrote Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, (2003) a book where she describes her experiences as a working woman(donna che lavora) in the Islamic Republic of Iran. In the book, she declares “I left Iran, but Iran did not leave me.” The following novel, an autobiography, Things I’ve been silent about: memories of a prodigal daughter (2008), describes the difficult relationship (relazione) with her parents, the sufferings (sofferenze) and the price (prezzo) a family pays for freedom (libertà) in a country plagued (piagata) by political disorder (disordini politici). Nafisi has held (ha tenuto) a post at the Foreign Policy Institute of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC and has served on the Board of Trustees of Freedom House, a United States nongovernmental organization (NGO) supporting democracy. She has been accused of (è stata accusata) having connections (connivenza) with neo-conservatism and colonialism. Asked if she had welcomed (sarebbe stata contenta) an intervention of foreign powers in Iran, she answered that her country did not need it and opposed the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Edward Franklin Albee III (1928-), born somewhere in Virginia, was adopted two weeks later and taken to New York in Westchester County, where he grew up. His father was the son of vaudeville magnate Edward Franklin Albee II, owner of several theatres. His parents tried to give him a high education and to introduce him into their social circles, but most of the schools he attended expelled him and soon he left his family. He revealed: “I never felt comfortable (non mi sono mai sentito a mio agio) with the adoptive parents. I don’t think they knew how to be parents. I probably didn’t know how to be a son, either.” Probably they did not agree (non erano d’accordo) with his aspirations as a writer. In New York’s Greenwich Village, Albee did many jobs (fece molti lavori) while studying to become a writer. His first play was The Zoo Story, first performed (presentata) in Berlin. Now he is promoting (promuove) American university theatre courses and holds (tiene) a playwriting course (corso per scrittori di teatro) at the University of Houston. Albee has received three Pulitzer Prizes for drama for A Delicate Balance (1967), Seascape (1975), and Three Tall Women (1994), but he is mainly (principalmente) famous for Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf ?. His works are unsympathetic examinations (analisi distaccate) of the modern condition and Albee is considered the exponent of the American Theatre of the Absurd. Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf ? is a play on the title of the once popular song “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” from Walt Disney’s The Three Little Pigs, but named after (ha preso il nome da) the famous English novelist. The story takes place in the house of George and Martha who invite a new professor and his wife (Nick and Honey) to their house. Martha and George drink and exchange mocking words (si scambiano parole di scherno) to one another in front of the embarrassed younger couple.

His play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf was selected for the 1963 Pulitzer Prize by the award’s drama jury, but was overruled by the advisory committee, which elected not to give a drama award at all. Albee was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1972.[6] in 1999, Albee received the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award as a Master American Dramatist. He received a Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement (2005); the Gold Medal in Drama from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters (1980); as well as the Kennedy Center Honors and the National Medal of Arts (both in 1996). In 2009 Albee received honorary degree a.k.a. “Doctor Honoris Causa” by the Bulgarian National Academy of Theater and Film Arts (NATFA), a member of the Global Alliance of Theater Schools.

Albee is the President of the Edward F. Albee Foundation, Inc., which maintains the William Flanagan Memorial Creative Persons Center, a writers and artists colony in Montauk, New York.

In 2008, in celebration of Albee’s eightieth birthday, a number of his plays were mounted in distinguished Off Broadway venues, including the historic Cherry Lane Theatre. The playwright directed two of his one-acts, The American Dream and The Sandbox there. These were first produced at the theater in 1961 and 1962, respectively. American playwright, best known for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, A Delicate Balance and Seascape.

Joe R. Lansdale was born on October 28, 1951. Sometimes he uses the pen names of Ray Slater, Brad Simmons and Jack Buchanan. He is an American author and martial-arts expert – he teaches at his own Shen Chuan martial arts school and is a member of the Martial Arts Hall of Fame. Lansdale has written novels and stories in many genres, including Western, horror, science fiction, mystery, and suspense. His writing are usually deeply ironic, characterised by sharp humour (humor sottile) and “wisecracking” dialogue (dialoghi ricchi di freddure). The situations he describes are strange and the characters appear in absurd situations. An example is Elvis and JFK battling a soul-sucking (che succhia le anime) Ancient Egyptian mummy in a nursing home(casa di cura) in the novella Bubba Ho-Tep, then made into a movie by Don Coscarelli (2002). He won many awards such the British Fantasy Award, the American Horror Award, the Edgar Award, and seven Bram Stoker Awards. His best known works features as protagonists “Hap and Leonard”, two friends and expert fighters (lottatori), Hap Collins and Leonard Pine, who live in the town of Laborde, Texas and find themselves solving a variety of often unpleasant crimes. Hap is a white working class labourer in his mid forties, and Leonard is a gay black man. The stories are told from Hap’s narrative point of view. They describe a great deal of violence, profanity and sex. Lansdale’s portrait of East Texas is a country where racism, ignorance, corruption and brutality ruin a native goodness of soul (bontà d’animo). The detectives have to deal with the dark side of human beings such as paedophilia and anti-gay violence. Lansdale now lives in Nacogdoches and is the writer in residence at Stephen F. Austin State University. Among his most famous works are Batman: the Animated Series; The Drive-In Saga; Savage Season series; Hap Collins and Leonard Pine” mysteries (Bad Chili ,1997; Rumble Tumble ,1998; Devil Red,2011); The “Ned the Seal” trilogy; Stone: M.I.A. Hunter series. His best selling graphic novels and comic books include Lone Ranger & Tonto, Jonah Hex: Two Gun Mojo, Jonah Hex: Riders of the Worm and Such, Blood and Shadows, The Spirit: The New Adventures, Conan and the Songs of the Dead, Marvel Adventures: Fantastic Four, Pigeons from Hell , Dread Island.

Kathleen Joan Toelle “Kathy” Reichs (1950 – ) is an American crime writer, forensic anthropologist and academic. She divides her work time between the Laboratoire des Sciences Judiciaires et de Médecine Légale for the province of Quebec and her professorship at University of North Carolina. She is one of the eighty-two forensic anthropologists certified by the American Board of anthropology of Forensic Anthropology and of Forensic Sciences.

Besides her technical books, Reichs has written nineteen novels translated into 30 languages. She is famous for her series who features Temperance “Tempe” Brennan, a forensic anthropologist as the protagonist. The author confesses that she and Brennan “have the same curriculum ” and some traits of personality. The novels are based on real life science, Reich has used experience from her career in her novels, for example in the novel Grave Secrets she recalls her experience in Guatemala. She has also written three young adult novels named Virals (2010), Seizure (2011) and Code (2013) centered around Tempe’s great-niece, Tory Brennan, and a pack of her friends Ben, Hiram, Shelton and wolfdog. Reichs is producer for the TV series Bones.

Emily Deschanel: Temperance “Bones” Brennan

David Boreanaz: Seeley Booth

Jon Krakauer (1954 – ), writer and mountaineer and well known for his writing about the noutdoors and mountain-climbing, is the author of best-selling non-fiction books. Into the Wild (1996) is about the true story of Christopher McCandless, a young man who, after graduating from college, began a journey in the American West. The novel was adapted into a film by Sean Penn in 2007.Into Thin Air, (1997) describes the experiences and the general state of Everest mountaineering. Under the Banner of Heaven (2003) examines the extremes of religious belief, particularly of Mormonism. Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman (2007) reports the journals and letters of Pat Tillman, professional football player and US Army Ranger who died in Afghanistan becoming a symbol of American sacrifice and heroism.

Clive Eric Cussler (1931 -), member of the National Underwater Marine Agency (NUMA) and marine archaeologist (archeologo) , has discovered more than sixty shipwreck sites (luoghi di naufragi). He writes thriller novels mainly based on the sea. Its most popular series is the Dirk Pitt adventure novels , featuring as a protagonist Major Dirk Pitt of the United States Air Force now part of The National Underwater and Marine Agency as Special Projects Director. The first of these novel appeared in 1973, The Mediterranean Caper, (famous in the U. K. with the title MAYDAY!), the latest (il più recente), Crescent Dawn (2010). Other series are NUMA Files adventure novels, focused (incentrati) on Kurt Austin, Team Leader of NUMA’s Special Assignments division and his adventures; The Oregon Files, set (che si svolgono) on a ship named Oregon; Isaac Bell tales, set in the early part of the 20th century; Fargo Adventures, about two professional treasure hunters (cacciatore di tesori). Two of his novels have been adapted for the cinema: Raise the Titanic written in 1976 and turned into a movie by Jerry Jameson in 1980 and Sahara, the eleventh book in Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series , written in 1992 and directed by Breck Eisner in 2005.

Elizabeth George is an American writer with a master’s degree in Counseling/Psychology and an honorary doctorate of humane letters. After working as a teacher for thirteen and a half years, she left education with the success of her first novel, A Great Deliverance , featuring the peculiar police couple Lynley and Havers and set in England. Most of her novels have been filmed by for television by the BBC.
Castello di inganni – Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George – Inspector Lynley and detective Barbara Havers return working together with the Simon and Deborah St. James to investigate the apparently natural death of Ian Cresswell at the request of the man’s uncle, the wealthy and influential Bernard Fairclough …

Thomas Harris (1940 – ) and he is known as the creator the famous character, Dr. Hannibal Lecter, brilliant psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial killer. Born in Tennessee and graduated in Texas, he worked as a reporter for the local newspaper, the Waco Tribune-Herald, covering the police beat.In 1968, he moved to New York City to work for the Associated Press until 1974 he began work on his first novel Black Sunday (1975) about a terrorist attack. But the work who made him famous was the multi-Oscar winning The Silence of the Lambs (1988), which became only the third film in Academy Award history to sweep the Oscars in major categories. Among his other works are Red Dragon (1981), first of the Hannibal series and The Silence of the Lambs’ sequels Hannibal (1999) and Hannibal Rising (2006)

Yaniv “Nev” Schulman (1984) is an Israeli-American producer, actor, and photographer, best known for the 2010 documentary Catfish. He is also the host and executive producer to the follow up TV series Catfish: The TV Show on MTV.
In Real Life : Love, Lies & Identity in the Digital Age by Nev Schulman – The book is a definite guide about how to connect people authentically in today’s increasingly digital world and is written by Nev Shulman the host of MTV’s show Catfish. Who is a Catfish? It is someone who creates a false online persona to reel someone into a romantic relationship. From his own experience the author brings his expertise to the page sharing insider secrets about the complexities of online identity and providing essential advice about how we should all be living and loving in the era of social media.


Lauren Weisberger
(1977) is an American novelist who became popular for the 2003 bestseller The Devil Wears Prada adapted into a film by David Frankel, starring Anne Hathaway and Meryl Streep (2006). The novel was followed by Everyone Worth Knowing (2005), Chasing Harry Winston (2008) and Last Night at Chateau Marmont (2010). Revenge wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger – Ten years have passed since Andy Sachs quit the job at runaway magazine directed by Miranda Priestly. Together with her former enemy Emily, she has founded a successful bridal magazine, The Plunge. Also her private life is going in full sail: she has met the man of her life – confident, successful, and drop-dead gorgeous. But the past is haunting her and she will soon find on her path the devil herself…once again.

Louise J. Kaplan (1929 – 2012) was a psychoanalyst, author, and feminist scholar who used a psychological lens to soberly define embarassing topics like sexual perversity and fetish. Her publications include The Farewell to Childhood, The Family Romance of the Impostor Poet-Thomas Chatterton, Female Perversions: The Temptations of Emma Bovary, and No Voice is Ever Wholly Lost.Female Perversions (The Temptations of Emma Bovary) This fascinating study challenges the traditional view that perversion represents deviant sexual behaviour. Dr. Kaplan used the character of Madame Bovary, who Flaubert depicted as an adulterous provincial housewife, to explain how women are enslaved by stereotypes. She treats Madame Bovary as a patient, and uncovers self-defeating perversion in her desire to look extravagantly or sometimes masculine.
The book was made into a film by Susan Streitfeld in 1996.

 

Sylvia Browne (1936 – 2013) claimed to be a medium and to have psychic abilities. She appeared regularly on television and radio, and was the subject of frequent criticism for making psychic predictions later proven false Among her publications Secret and Mysteries of the World. Secret Societies …and how they affect our lives today) – Helped by her spirit guide Francine, Sylvia Browne has uncovered the fact that many secret societies affect the lives of each of us in every field every day. From the mysterious secrets of the Knights Templar to the powerful secret societies of the modern age no one has even heard about, the author takes us to explore and unearth the truth.

Alan Friedman (1956) is an American journalist and media executive. Friedman was educated at New York University (NYU) (B.A. Politics and History), the London School of Economics (International Relations) and the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (M.A. International Economics and Law).  He worked in the administration of President Jimmy Carter in the role of Presidential Management Intern. From 1979 to 1993 he worked for the Financial Times of London. His professional relationship with the International Herald Tribune and RAI made way, in 1999, to a joint venture for the co-production of the weekly programs World Business/Pianeta Economia (Planet Economy), produced by FBC. Friedman’s television career began in the early 1980s with regular appearances on BBC Newsnight. In 1991 he participated, with Ted Koppel of the ABC Nightline program. He hosted the Alan Friedman Show, a peak talk show on the Sky TG24 news channel in Italy. From 1994 to 2003 Friedman was global economics correspondent of the IHT.From 2003 to 2005 he was global economy columnist for the Wall Street Journal Europe.

Edward Franklin Albee III (1928-), born somewhere in Virginia, was adopted two weeks later and taken to New York in Westchester County, where he grew up. His father was the son of vaudeville magnate Edward Franklin Albee II, owner of several theatres. His parents tried to give him a high education and to introduce him into their social circles, but most of the schools he attended expelled him and soon he left his family. He revealed: “I never felt comfortable (non mi sono mai sentito a mio agio) with the adoptive parents. I don’t think they knew how to be parents. I probably didn’t know how to be a son, either.” Probably they did not agree (non erano d’accordo) with his aspirations as a writer. In New York’s Greenwich Village, Albee did many jobs (fece molti lavori) while studying to become a writer. His first play was The Zoo Story, first performed (presentata) in Berlin. Now he is promoting (promuove) American university theatre courses and holds (tiene) a playwriting course (corso per scrittori di teatro) at the University of Houston. Albee has received three Pulitzer Prizes for drama for A Delicate Balance (1967), Seascape (1975), and Three Tall Women (1994), but he is mainly (principalmente) famous for Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf ?. His works are unsympathetic examinations (analisi distaccate) of the modern condition and Albee is considered the exponent of the American Theatre of the Absurd. Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf ? is a play on the title of the once popular song “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” from Walt Disney’s The Three Little Pigs, but named after (ha preso il nome da) the famous English novelist. The story takes place in the house of George and Martha who invite a new professor and his wife (Nick and Honey) to their house. Martha and George drink and exchange mocking words (si scambiano parole di scherno) to one another in front of the embarrassed younger couple.

John Ray Grisham, Jr. (1955) is an American lawyer, politician, and author, best known for his popular legal thrillers. After attending the University of Mississippi School of Law in 1981, he practiced criminal law for about a decade and served in the House of Representatives in Mississippi from January 1984 to September 1990. He began writing his first novel, A Time to Kill, in 1984 (published in June 1989). His first bestseller was The Firm (1991); which was adapted into a 1993 feature film of the same name, starring Tom Cruise, in a 2012 TV series which “continues the story of attorney Mitchell McDeere and his family 10 years after the events of the film and novel.” Eight of his other novels have also been adapted into films: The Chamber, The Client, A Painted House, The Pelican Brief, Skipping Christmas, The Rainmaker, The Runaway Jury, and A Time to Kill.
The Pelican Brief – Darby Shaw a student in law investigates on two strange murders: two judges of the Supreme Court are killed on
the same night in different places. She writes a theory – which will be then called Pelican Brief by FBI: she thinks that the sender of the murders is an oil tycoon who wants to drill on a land inhabited by an endangered spice of pelicans. But the oil tycoon is also a supporter of one of the men involved in the presidential rash and starts killing all the people who know the truth: fisrt he starts with Darby‘s professor ( and her lover). Darby gets in touch with a journalist who will help her to unveil the truth.

La protagonista è una studentessa in legge Darby Shaw che insospettita da due tragiche morti indaga e formula una tesi, denominata in seguito dall’FBI “rapporto Pelican”. Si tratta dell’omicidio di due giudici della Corte Suprema americana uccisi la stessa notte in due posti diversi. Il professore della ragazza consegna il rapporto ad un suo amico dell’FBI: Darby accusa un magnate del petrolio di essere il mandante degli omicidi perché vuole vincere una causa e sfruttare un giacimento. Le cose si complicano in quando il magnate in questione è anche il finanziatore più in vista della campagna presidenziale, così la Casa Bianca insabbia l’ipotesi. Ma il magnate decide che è più opportuno assassinare tutte le persone che hanno visto il rapporto: il primo è il professore di Darby (e suo amante), seguono il suo amico dell’FBI e ultima vittima sarebbe la ragazza che però riesce a fuggire. Anzi Darby si mette anche in contatto con un giornalista che indagherà insieme a lei ..ovviamente le indagini avranno successo.

Jon Krakauer (1954 -). followed Jack London’s example. American writer and mountaineer (sclatore), well-known for outdoor and mountain-climbing writing (scritti su scalate e vita nella natura), Jon Krakauer wrote Into the Wild in 1996. The book tells the true story of Christopher McCandless, a young man from a wealthy (benestante) East Coast family who, after graduating from college (aver preso la laurea), gave all his money to charity (in carità), called himself ( si fece chiamare) Alexander Supertramp, (tramp: vagabondo) and left his family to travel in the American West. Two years and four months later, his decomposed body was found dead in the Alaska wilderness (posto selvaggio). In the book, Krakauer draws parallels (traccia un parallelo) between his own experiences and motivations and those of the protagonist of his book. Into The Wild was adapted into a film in 2007 by Sean Penn.

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